February 17, 2009

Richardson reconsidering stance on death penalty


4 comments:

  1. the reason he is deciding against the death penalty is because he knows he is going to jail and does not want the death penalty himself!!!

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  2. Jimmy Green - Albuquerque,NMFebruary 18, 2009

    The Anaya legacy continues. Wonder who he's pardoning? Well, don't come crying to me when crime is out of control and you want something done about it. The stance in this state is revolving door policy. Doesn't really work too well with that pesky death penalty thing there...

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  3. Khal Spencer Los Alamos,NMFebruary 18, 2009

    Repeal it. We keep seeing people exonerated by modern scientific techniques who were wrongfully convicted. And those are just the cases where science had a role to play. Not all situations can be tested.

    Its hard to reverse a wrongful conviction after you throw the switch.

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  4. Elliot Gould - Santa Fe,NMFebruary 18, 2009

    Khal Spencer wrote:
    Repeal it. We keep seeing people exonerated by modern scientific techniques who were wrongfully convicted. And those are just the cases where science had a role to play. Not all situations can be tested.
    Its hard to reverse a wrongful conviction after you throw the switch.

    It's not only hard to reverse; it is impossible. That is why death penalty and other violent crimes need cases need be handled with precision in every detail.
    Our American concept of "due process" requires that
    the innocent man is not convicted. As we have seen in the DNA testings from cases convictions of the wrong individual abounded--- labs forwarded "evidences that would please the prosecutor--who would return for business. The prison and justice centers after all run on a concept of "why try them?--they're bound to be set free...better force a plea...and go from there , and another downward spiral into the abyss that is belly of society...The State must require certainty in both statutes and procedures which would prevent the
    wrongful and irretrievable act before attempting to effect a "death penalty".
    Governor Johnson erred in 2001, and the moratorium should continue...though I do not object to its proclamation or a statute.

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